What is a huge help for me is following the rule: Clean as you go. My house isn't superbly clean (You'll find dust on the baseboards if you look closely), but I'll be damned if my house isn't well organized. No clutter or mess. Also, it looks clean enough for people to comment on how clean it is when they visit. This rule means that as soon as I'm done using anything, it goes back in it's place. Cooking for example, I'll cook with multiple pots and pans, cleaning them as I go. By the time I'm sitting down, the only dirty dishes that remain are the plate I'm eating on and my fork.
Disclaimer: The information provided on this website, by MaxLiving, is for general use only. Any statement or recommendation on this website does not take the place of medical advice nor is meant to replace the guidance of your licensed healthcare practitioner. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. MaxLiving information is and products are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or provide medical advice. Decisions to use supplements to support your specific needs should be considered in partnership with your licensed healthcare practitioner.
10. Stop complaining for the next 100 days. A couple of years back, Will Bowen gave a purple rubber bracelet to each person in his congregation to remind them to stop complaining. “Negative talk produces negative thoughts; negative thoughts produce negative results”, says Bowen. For the next 100 days, whenever you catch yourself complaining about anything, stop yourself.
Psychologists have been studying "expressive writing," or journaling about difficult moments in your life, for a few decades. They've found that a few minutes journaling improves everything from your mood to immune system to sporting performance. Psychology researchers have repeatedly found that keeping a "gratitude journal" can improve well-being.
Encouraged by the research conducted so far, many integrative medicine nutritionists and other health professionals are including detoxification protocols in their clinical practice.21 Because research still is under way regarding the details of how food can be used as a clinical detoxification tool, no one detoxification protocol currently exists, leaving health practitioners to review the research and interpret how that translates to clinical practice.

May we use “Live long and prosper” not only as a blessing but also as a way of reminding those with whom we share our journey that long life and prosperity are often more about quality than quantity. This is not an injunction to extend life or wealth. It is an encouragement to seek wisdom, practice selflessness, and live a life worth emulating. May we provide such a powerful example of all these characteristics and more that others will understand how to pass this blessing on to those who come after us.
Healthy eating is not about strict dietary limitations, staying unrealistically thin, or depriving yourself of the foods you love. Rather, it’s about feeling great, having more energy, improving your health, and boosting your mood. If you feel overwhelmed by all the conflicting nutrition and diet advice out there, you’re not alone. It seems that for every expert who tells you a certain food is good for you, you’ll find another saying exactly the opposite. But by using these simple tips, you can cut through the confusion and learn how to create—and stick to—a tasty, varied, and nutritious diet that is as good for your mind as it is for your body.
Backward Scheduling: Too much to do every day? Use this simple technique to determine a realistic schedule. Write down everything you want to get done today. Then put a time estimate on each task (make sure it's not a multi-day project!) and add up the time. Things always seem to take more time than we expect so overestimate a bit Compare what you have to do with how much time you have available and adjust to fit. Of course, some things will have to move to tomorrow. At least now you're in control. Schedule your tasks into the day beginning with the time you need to finish.

For a 2,000-calorie daily diet, aim for 2½ cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit a day. If you consume more calories, aim for more produce; if you consume fewer calories, you can eat less. Include green, orange, red, blue/purple, and yellow vegetables and fruits. In addition to the fiber, the nutrients and phytochemicals in these foods may help protect against certain types of cancer and other diseases. Legumes, rich in fiber, can count as vegetables (though they have more calories than most vegetables). For more fiber, choose whole fruits over juice.
Corporate coach Beth Weissenberger of the Handel Group has worked with executives at companies like GE and the New York Times, teaching them how to navigate office politics for maximum productivity and success. Office politics shouldn't mean gossiping and manipulation, Weissenberger said. They should be about building meaningful relationships with the people you're surrounded by all day.
Finally, there’s the economy. Survival in the hypercompetitive, globalized economy, where workers have fewer protections and are more disposable than ever, requires that we try to become faster, smarter, and more creative. (To this list of marketable qualities I’d add one with a softer edge: niceness, which the gig economy and its five-star rating system have made indispensable to everyone from cabdrivers to plumbers.) Anything less than our best won’t cut it.
But soon enough February will come, mid-winter doldrums will set in, and you’ll start to slide. Not to worry. Jane McGonigal’s “SuperBetter” tells you how to gamify your way back from the edge with the help of video-game-inspired techniques like finding “allies” and collecting motivational “power-ups”; and Angela Duckworth’s “Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance” reminds you that persistence makes all the difference when the going gets rough. Duckworth doesn’t think you need talent in order to become, as another of Duhigg’s books puts it, “Smarter Better Faster,” and neither do any of these other experts. According to their systems, anyone can learn to be more efficient, more focussed, more effective in the pursuit of happiness and, that most hallowed of modern traits, productivity. And if you can’t, well, that’s on you.
Self-help advice tends to reflect the beliefs and priorities of the era that spawns it. A decade ago, the reigning champion of the genre was “The Secret,” published in 2006 by an Australian, Rhonda Byrne. Like Norman Vincent Peale before her, Byrne combined a literal interpretation of select verses from the Christian Bible—notably Matthew 21:22, “Whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, ye shall receive”—with the acquisitive gospel of positive thinking. If you sent a wish out into the universe with enough faith, she told her readers, it could come to pass. Want to find a husband? Clean out a closet for the man of your dreams and imagine him hanging up his ties. Want to get rid of your glasses? Picture yourself acing your next vision exam and kiss those progressive lenses goodbye. In retrospect, “The Secret,” which sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, seems a testament to the predatory optimism that characterized the years leading up to the financial crisis. People dreamed big, and, in a day of easy money, found that their dreams could come true. Then the global economy crashed, and we were shaken violently awake—at least for a time.
Eating a healthy diet doesn’t have to be overly complicated. While some specific foods or nutrients have been shown to have a beneficial effect on mood, it’s your overall dietary pattern that is most important. The cornerstone of a healthy diet pattern should be to replace processed food with real food whenever possible. Eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it can make a huge difference to the way you think, look, and feel.
I’m a little surprised to find my own mortality doesn’t scare me. What does scare me is not speaking French and accidentally asking for directions to a strip club instead of a bathroom. (just for instance. I don’t know how to say either one). I’m scared of being inadvertently served wine or alcohol while politely tasting foods served to me in Iceland or France. What if they don’t have a word for “Sober”?
Let’s put it out there: you’re going to face things you don’t like today. Maybe it’s rush hour traffic on your way to work, being paired up with your least favorite coworker for a project, or something worse like a new diagnosis or a fight with your significant other. Whatever it is, it’s going to put a damper on your day and challenge you to focus on the good in order to push through without losing your cool, losing your peace,…
Tracking & auditing expenses should be something done on a daily basis. Whether you use a notepad or a digital spreadsheet, it’s important to know every penny going out the door. Small leaks sink big ships. $5 per-day latte habits equate to $1825 spent on coffee a year. $20 lunches out every single day equates to $7300 a year. Track and audit all of your expenses.
Much like planning out your meals, doing meal prep saves you a lot of time—which is super helpful when the going gets busy as hell. When it comes to meal prepping, there are a few things you'll need to get yourself started: The right storage containers (AKA a sturdy set of BPA-free Tupperware), a well stocked pantry, fridge, and freezer, and a couple hours to spare on Sunday night.

NOTE: The practices we share we with you are simply an example of the many ways that WLC game players can accomplish their daily mobility. These are intended to help you explore both your body’s potential and the vast world of movement. Dr. Grayson Wickham is a physical therapist, strength and conditioning specialist, and founder of Movement Vault. He is obsessed with anything and everything related to flexibility, mobility, training, increasing performance, decreasing injury risk, and recovery. Dr. Grayson focuses…
Going forward, try using filters to group important emails or automatically archive ones you don't want to delete, like receipts, but don't want in your inbox. You can also decide to limit how much you look at email and only check on a set timeframe, like once every hour or two. Then you may be better able to devote energy and concentration to the task.
What is moderation? In essence, it means eating only as much food as your body needs. You should feel satisfied at the end of a meal, but not stuffed. For many of us, moderation means eating less than we do now. But it doesn’t mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza.
Participating in addictive habits can give one a case of the “F-it’s” and the “Might as wells”. For example “F it. I’m already smoking, might as well eat what I want too.” The mud got deeper and stickier. I ate fast food, ignored deadlines and neglected obligations. I toyed with ideas of “just one drink”. Thankfully I have accountability to my treatment program. When it’s hard to trust oneself, impending drug tests are a convincing reason to abstain. So I didn’t drink, but I smoked nicotine incessantly. Good thing the tests don’t look for nicotine or caffeine. (Treatment centers everywhere would be out of business.)
The results At the end of the month, Johnson was shocked to find that, even after eating nearly twice as much, she felt less bloated and her clothes fit better. She had also lost eight pounds. "I couldn't believe how great I felt. I no longer had that midday drag. I realized I hadn't been kind to my body by eating as little as possible," Johnson says. "I've felt better in the past 30 days than I have in a long time. I get out of the shower and look at myself in the mirror and feel so great. I'm getting off the roller coaster."
10. Stop complaining for the next 100 days. A couple of years back, Will Bowen gave a purple rubber bracelet to each person in his congregation to remind them to stop complaining. “Negative talk produces negative thoughts; negative thoughts produce negative results”, says Bowen. For the next 100 days, whenever you catch yourself complaining about anything, stop yourself.
Some still consider fasting -- in any form -- to be "out there." "When I review diets that are not based on science, the question I ask myself is: Would I feed them to my family? In this case, the answer is a clear no," says Susan Roberts, PhD, chief of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and a professor of nutrition at Tufts University in Boston.
This sounds suspiciously like self-help-speak, Storr acknowledges. He is quick to say that he isn’t encouraging anything quite as clichéd as self-acceptance. At the same time, he reports that he has, in fact, come to accept himself. “Since I learned that low agreeableness and high neuroticism are relatively stable facets of my personality, rather than signs of some shameful psychological impurity, I’ve stopped berating myself so frequently,” he writes. Instead, he now apologizes to those whom his disagreeableness and his neuroticism have offended. This seems like good, common sense, but Storr has another, more radical suggestion to make. Since it is our environment that is causing us to feel inferior, it is our environment that we must change: “The things we’re doing with our lives, the people we’re sharing it with, the goals we have. We should find projects to pursue which are not only meaningful to us, but over which we have efficacy.” Storr means to be helpful, but changing every aspect of the world we inhabit is a daunting prospect. No wonder people try to change themselves instead.

Her new eating plan Dietitian Sandon calculated that Johnson was eating only 800 calories a day—so few that she was slowing her metabolism and unable to build muscle. She created a plan to raise Johnson to 1,500 calories a day, enough to get nutrients without causing weight gain. Working with Sandon, Johnson began eating three meals a day, including a breakfast of eggs, fruit, and whole-grain toast, which is high in fiber, to keep foods moving through the body. At each meal, Johnson added a nutritious bonus, such as a yogurt smoothie for calcium. Finally, Sandon urged Johnson to share in the meals she cooked for her family to make eating a positive experience for her and to set a good example for her daughters.
My garage was beyond do-it-myself help. It was going to require a professional. Just the thought of standing on the cold cement floor amidst the mayhem was enough to cause heart palpitations. Luckily, I know a stellar resource – Lauren at Casual Uncluttering. I’d found her awhile back through thumbtack.com, which was suggested to me by a coworker when I was looking for a handyman. I didn’t even know professional organizers existed until then.
To gain weight safely in older age, eat several smaller meals and focus on nutrient-dense foods. Examples include oatmeal with berries and walnuts; a salad with spinach, tomatoes, cheese, beans, shelled sunflower seeds, and avocado dressing; brown rice with raisins, almonds, chicken chunks, and asparagus pieces; or simple meals and snacks such as scrambled eggs with cheese or whole-wheat crackers with peanut butter. A healthy weight gain should happen slowly. Aim for gaining 2 or 3 pounds per month. (Locked) More »
What is a huge help for me is following the rule: Clean as you go. My house isn't superbly clean (You'll find dust on the baseboards if you look closely), but I'll be damned if my house isn't well organized. No clutter or mess. Also, it looks clean enough for people to comment on how clean it is when they visit. This rule means that as soon as I'm done using anything, it goes back in it's place. Cooking for example, I'll cook with multiple pots and pans, cleaning them as I go. By the time I'm sitting down, the only dirty dishes that remain are the plate I'm eating on and my fork.
Alex may not have wanted me, personally, but the “rejection” isn’t personal. It’s subjective; a projection of his own reality. Other’s opinions and preferences have little to nothing to do with us. They most definitely do not have bearing on our value. (For an excellent explanation of this phenomenon, check out The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz.)
Storr’s explanation for how we got into this predicament has three strands. First, there is nature. “Because of the way our brains function, our sense of ‘me’ naturally runs in narrative mode,” he writes; studies show that we are hardwired to see life as a story in which we star. At the same time, he says, we are tribal creatures, evolved during our hunter-gatherer years to value coöperation and, at the same time, to respect hierarchy and covet status—“to get along and get ahead.”
I think the best solutions are going to be too specific to your situation for us to really be able to help with, but I think the easiest things to do are to lower your standards (e.g. I vacuum the apartment maybe once a month if it seems dirty) and spend less time in your apartment (it's only you that's creating this mess). I rarely had a cleaner apartment than when I was working 65 hours a week because I didn't have time to muss the apartment
“One of the best ways to reboot your diet is to rethink your fruits and vegetables. Both fruits and vegetables provide fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (natural plant chemicals that help fight and prevent disease),” Toby Amidor, MS, RD, author of "Smart Meal Prep for Beginners," says. Most Americans aren’t anywhere close to meeting their needs. (90 percent fall short of vegetable recommendations and 85 percent aren’t meeting their fruit quota.) To help you boost your intake and your overall health, Amidor offers these suggestions: “Add sliced strawberries to your oatmeal at breakfast, opt for a vegetable salad topped with lean protein at lunch, and fill half your dinner plate with a steamed vegetable medley. And don’t forget snacks! Enjoy sliced carrots, celery and jicama with hummus or top your Greek yogurt with sliced strawberries.”
Your tip So-called toxins don't cause belly bloat and lethargy, but too much salt will. In addition to cutting back on pickles, olives, and chips, watch for stealthy sources such as canned veggies and condiments. Look for high-fiber packaged snacks that contain less than 100 milligrams of sodium per serving to help keep the digestive system humming.
It’s extraordinary to be able to say: “I fought for my kids; I fought for what was right; I fought for good health; I fought to protect my company; I fought for a good career that would bless my family. I fought a good fight.” It’s good to fight the encroachment. Opposites are in conflict and you’re in the middle. If you want something valuable, you’ve got to fight for it.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Federal Trade Commission have taken action against several companies selling detox/cleansing products because they contained illegal, potentially harmful ingredients; were marketed using false claims that they could treat serious diseases; or (in the case of medical devices used for colon cleansing) were marketed for unapproved uses.
Backward Scheduling: Too much to do every day? Use this simple technique to determine a realistic schedule. Write down everything you want to get done today. Then put a time estimate on each task (make sure it's not a multi-day project!) and add up the time. Things always seem to take more time than we expect so overestimate a bit Compare what you have to do with how much time you have available and adjust to fit. Of course, some things will have to move to tomorrow. At least now you're in control. Schedule your tasks into the day beginning with the time you need to finish.
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