But soon enough February will come, mid-winter doldrums will set in, and you’ll start to slide. Not to worry. Jane McGonigal’s “SuperBetter” tells you how to gamify your way back from the edge with the help of video-game-inspired techniques like finding “allies” and collecting motivational “power-ups”; and Angela Duckworth’s “Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance” reminds you that persistence makes all the difference when the going gets rough. Duckworth doesn’t think you need talent in order to become, as another of Duhigg’s books puts it, “Smarter Better Faster,” and neither do any of these other experts. According to their systems, anyone can learn to be more efficient, more focussed, more effective in the pursuit of happiness and, that most hallowed of modern traits, productivity. And if you can’t, well, that’s on you.
In 1989, I began my sophomore year at Baylor University. My best friend, Kevin, had been hired to be a resident assistant (RA) in the dorms that year and had left our shared state of South Carolina a few weeks prior to attend RA camp and receive his training for the job. I soon followed, arriving at school a week before classes began, so that I could settle into my dorm room early and hang out with my friend.
Days turned into weeks, and before I knew it, I’d been smoking steadily for a month. I was disgusted with myself. Smoking made me lazy and nauseated. Addiction is dishonest, isolating, depressing, and anxiety inducing; smoking re-awakened all of that, along with the clinging, craving monster inside. Instead of going to the gym – I smoked. Instead of writing – I smoked. I wasted hours lighting them up and putting them out. And yet, a part of me relished every single drag. My dirty little secret made me feel self-righteous, cool and aloof. Emotionally, I was wrecked and seeking relief. I’d found a solution that both soothed and fueled the addiction monster. Returning to this behavior was like slipping back under the mud after a period of living in the sun. I was sober, but acting very much like my non-sober self. Literally playing with fire.
If all you have time for is a quick snack from the gas station or drugstore, know that you do have options, and if you know what you're looking for, it will be easier to find. When we asked registered dietitians to recommend snacks to buy at the drugstore, they tended to go for things like nuts and seeds that pack plenty of flavor (hi, wasabi chickpeas), plenty of protein, and not a whole lot else.
"A smoothie with only fruits and fruit juice is essentially dessert!" Rebecca Lewis, in-house R.D. at HelloFresh, tell SELF. Smoothies can definitely be a healthy meal option, provided you're using vegetables in addition to those fruits, and high-protein, high-fiber ingredients like almond milk and chia seeds. Unfortunately a lot of smoothies (especially store-bought varieties) tend to pack in sugar. In fact, a small size at common smoothie stores like Jamba Juice can often contain more than 50 grams of sugar. To be sure you don't end up with a total gut bomb, consider making smoothies yourself. Or double check the ingredient list at your favorite shops and supermarkets.
Supplements can't substitute for a healthy diet, which supplies other potentially beneficial compounds besides vitamins and minerals. Foods also provide the synergy that many nutrients require to be efficiently used in the body. Still, for many people a basic multivitamin/mineral pill can provide some of the nutrients they may fall short on. Certain people may also need supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D (see next slide).

Clean up your relationships: Air out your significant relationships at least twice a year. This includes voicing frustrations as well as talking about positive behaviors and actions desired from your loved one -- covering everything from fidelity to money and sex. Throw out misunderstanding, lack of patience, gossip or lies. Polish your friendships. True friendships take work, time, energy, and thoughtfulness. They also require forgiveness and understanding. You don't want to be a doormat to anyone, but you do want to find relationships that are equal and reciprocal. To clean up relationships that are not reciprocal, identify the difficult behavior and share with the family member, friend or partner how it makes you feel. Tell them face-to-face: "I'm not doing this anymore. This is your problem, not mine. I'm happy to have a relationship with you, but not with your current behavior." Then stick to it. Don't pick up the phone at all hours, don't tolerate abusive behavior and don't make excuses.
Me. The tree-sap leaking, makeup melting, yoga ninja. The puddle was growing, and I was non-too gracefully gliding through it. My head hung down between my lubricated hands, my eyes burned, blinded by sweat, and my butt perched high in the air. Every limb wiggled in different directions. Sort of like a newborn fawn might look on an ice rink. Only less graceful. And less cute.
“There’s no doubt in my mind that certain foods can both impair and enhance liver function,” Purdy says, adding that her vision of a detox diet is “short term—about one to three weeks—based on eating healthful whole foods—eg, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, beans, whole grains, herbs and spices—as well as eliminating foods that may add to the traffic jam or cause additional inflammation for some people such as refined sugar and certain food additives or preservatives.”

With that in mind, take a stab at creating some kind of artwork. It's going to take some time — we're asking for at least 90 minutes. If you have some sketching skills, you could draw a still life on your kitchen table. If you're less practiced, use pastels to create some abstract art. If you're prefer to stay linguistic, write a poem describing a scene you witnessed recently.

Her new eating plan VandeKerkhof made a big discovery when Dara Godfrey, M.S., R.D., a dietitian in New York City, asked her to keep a food diary. "Turns out, I was a saltaholic," she says. When she wasn't fasting, she snacked regularly on chips and salsa, pickles, and olives. "I started eating salsa with cucumber slices or high-fiber crackers instead. Right away, I lost five pounds." VandeKerkhof also took Godfrey's suggestion that she eat more dairy and protein to keep her feeling fuller longer and that she stabilize her blood sugar levels so she'd feel less moody and less captive to cravings. Godfrey also encouraged VandeKerkhof to eat a high-fiber breakfast (like Kashi Go Lean cereal) and a filling yet portion-controlled lunch (such as vegetable soup and a turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread), as it was the afternoon crash that typically sent her reaching for salty snacks.


In general terms, the detoxification process involves two, potentially three, phases. “Phase 1 enzyme activities include oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis reactions during which the chemical [or toxin] is ‘activated’ to a more unstable, reactive form,” Foroutan says, adding that the cytochrome P450 is the family of enzymes responsible for phase 1.1,2
Reject the idea of being overwhelmed. When we constantly use words like stressed, challenging, overwhelming, busy and hard. That is what the situation becomes. Replace those words with manageable, worthwhile and peaceful. Changing your thought process and your inner dialogue can help you see the positives in your situation and make the process feel less overwhelming.
In 1960, it was a technological impossibility for man to travel into outer space. However, within 10 years, the first man stepped out onto the surface of the moon. The miraculous process of converting that dream into reality began when one voice challenged the scientific community to do whatever was necessary to see to it that America “places a man on the moon by the end of this decade.” That challenge awakened the spirit of a nation by planting the seed of possible future achievement into the fertile soil of imagination.
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This sounds suspiciously like self-help-speak, Storr acknowledges. He is quick to say that he isn’t encouraging anything quite as clichéd as self-acceptance. At the same time, he reports that he has, in fact, come to accept himself. “Since I learned that low agreeableness and high neuroticism are relatively stable facets of my personality, rather than signs of some shameful psychological impurity, I’ve stopped berating myself so frequently,” he writes. Instead, he now apologizes to those whom his disagreeableness and his neuroticism have offended. This seems like good, common sense, but Storr has another, more radical suggestion to make. Since it is our environment that is causing us to feel inferior, it is our environment that we must change: “The things we’re doing with our lives, the people we’re sharing it with, the goals we have. We should find projects to pursue which are not only meaningful to us, but over which we have efficacy.” Storr means to be helpful, but changing every aspect of the world we inhabit is a daunting prospect. No wonder people try to change themselves instead.

Some still consider fasting -- in any form -- to be "out there." "When I review diets that are not based on science, the question I ask myself is: Would I feed them to my family? In this case, the answer is a clear no," says Susan Roberts, PhD, chief of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and a professor of nutrition at Tufts University in Boston.


It is important that you prepare your body for the detox program. Increasing the alkalinity of the body prepares it for the deeper cleansing of Detox. During Detox, your body releases toxins stored in tissues, these toxins enter the bloodstream and can cause a series of indications from rashes, aches and pains to bad breath, body odor, mood swings and disturbed sleep patterns. By following our Pre-Detox program you can mitigate or even eliminate these side effects.
What is moderation? In essence, it means eating only as much food as your body needs. You should feel satisfied at the end of a meal, but not stuffed. For many of us, moderation means eating less than we do now. But it doesn’t mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza.
Toxic overload is an often-overlooked factor in obesity, and the right detoxification plan can provide the nutrients your body requires to help you heal and lose weight. While these strategies are a powerfully effective starting point, a chiropractor or other healthcare professional can help you design a custom-tailored detoxification plan based on your individual needs.

“When something is upregulated, it's ‘turned on’ or activity is enhanced,” Foroutan explains. “And when it's downregulated, it's ‘turned off’ or blunted. So, in this case, upregulation of an enzyme pathway by a gene would mean more of that enzyme will be produced and secreted, assuming the proper cofactors are present in adequate amounts.” So eating certain foods has great potential to help facilitate or speed up the detoxification process, she says.
I drove to a gas station and awkwardly bought a pack of Camel cigarettes. On a scale of surrendering to cravings, it’s better than a bottle of vodka, worse than a giant brownie. I found a parking lot near the water and walked around in the rain (still in my dress and flip-flops, holding a sweatshirt over my head to save my wedding- hair) searching for a secluded place to smoke my first cigarette in years. It suddenly seemed crowds of people were milling around, screwing up my plan. And I certainly wasn’t going to smoke inside my own car. I have boundaries, after all.
Similarly, podcasts are a great on-the-go news source. And a lot of the time they’re just what you need to unwind without completely wasting away in front of the TV (not that I have anything against relaxing that way). I’m a big fan of tackling one podcast during my commute—half of it on the way to work, half on the way back, and the stories always bring out some real emotions. (For reference, my favorites are This American Life and You’re the Expert.)
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