During Kevin’s off hours, we attended movies, ate together, stayed up late talking, and began the gradual transition to playing racquetball (due to Kevin’s disdain at barely losing in tennis to me most days). The campus was relatively quiet that week, and when Sunday rolled around we stood at the back of the church’s sanctuary, hopelessly looking for a familiar face to sit with. Eventually, Kevin spotted two girls across the sanctuary that he had met at RA camp and suggested we sit with them. I agreed and we walked over. Kevin entered the row first, placing me at one end of the four of us. I later found out that this was a strategic move so that he could sit by the girl he wanted to. But it created a slight awkwardness, so that when I was introduced to the cute brunette at the opposite end, I had to lean forward to casually wave at the woman who would become my wife. Continue reading →
Think about failing when you were little. As a toddler, we have to learn to walk. If you ever watch a toddler learning to walk, she falls down many, many times. In other words, she fails countless times. Why is a child failing to learn to walk OK but you failing to learn a new skill as an adult a bad thing? At the end of the day it is still failure.
They don't have to be big things. It can literally be how great your coffee tastes, or how amazing the wind feels on your skin. Try to be thankful for something in that present moment. Not "dinner was delicious last night." Centering yourself is about connecting with where you are in the present and being grateful for what life is offering you now – no matter how small or insignificant you initially perceived it to be.
So the question is can diet be used to aid the body’s natural detoxification process? As Dean explains, the detoxification system already depends on specific nutrients from the diet, and although research on using specific foods in clinical practice to aid detoxification still is in its infancy, certain foods and nutrients have been found to be associated with the upregulation, or inducing, of detoxification enzymes, leading to more enzymes being present and a faster rate of xenobiotic detoxification.2
Her new eating plan VandeKerkhof made a big discovery when Dara Godfrey, M.S., R.D., a dietitian in New York City, asked her to keep a food diary. "Turns out, I was a saltaholic," she says. When she wasn't fasting, she snacked regularly on chips and salsa, pickles, and olives. "I started eating salsa with cucumber slices or high-fiber crackers instead. Right away, I lost five pounds." VandeKerkhof also took Godfrey's suggestion that she eat more dairy and protein to keep her feeling fuller longer and that she stabilize her blood sugar levels so she'd feel less moody and less captive to cravings. Godfrey also encouraged VandeKerkhof to eat a high-fiber breakfast (like Kashi Go Lean cereal) and a filling yet portion-controlled lunch (such as vegetable soup and a turkey sandwich on whole-wheat bread), as it was the afternoon crash that typically sent her reaching for salty snacks.
A better approach is to make a few small changes at a time. Keeping your goals modest can help you achieve more in the long term without feeling deprived or overwhelmed by a major diet overhaul. Think of planning a healthy diet as a number of small, manageable steps—like adding a salad to your diet once a day. As your small changes become habit, you can continue to add more healthy choices.
“Even if things aren’t OK, I’m OK”. I’m finding that it’s true, no partner necessary. I’m learning to glean security from a deep sense of intrinsic wholeness, and the community of support I’ve enmeshed myself in (yep, another She Recovers shout out. It’s true though). So while I’m wild and free to explore as I please, I’ve also got a wide net underneath of me, in case my feet falter. Which they have. Which they will again.
Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes (such as beans and lentils), and nuts—and limit highly processed foods. If you eat animal foods, you can add in some dairy products, fish, poultry, and lean meat. Studies show that people who eat this way have a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, and possibly cancer and other chronic diseases. Here are our guidelines for building a healthy diet.
The Gastropub won. I was buoyed by the fact that he wanted to continue through a meal. We’d intended the date to be casual and open ended. If we hit it off, we agreed it could range from a quick walk on the beach to other end of the spectrum – an overnight stay at the house his company was renting on the island. He’d mentioned the spectacular water view and hot tub. “Since you’re taking a ferry such a long way, maybe you’ll want to crash over night.”
In a few hours I’ll hand my passport over to the TSA at Sea-Tac airport, board a plane, begin to read, then immediately fall asleep reading (ideally after I’ve secured my head from bobbing around with a trusty neck pillow). When I wake up disoriented, shirt wet with drool (hopefully my own shirt and my own drool) I will have been transported through the air, like magic, to Iceland.
Your tip When you detox, you define eating as unhealthy and starvation as virtuous. Instead of depriving yourself as a ritual, focus on each bite and appreciate its health benefits. "I've started keeping nuts and fruit near me when I work, and I'm taking breaks to sit down and eat," Kai says. "Not only do I like eating more, but [I'm] also getting some quiet time."
Reject the idea of being overwhelmed. When we constantly use words like stressed, challenging, overwhelming, busy and hard. That is what the situation becomes. Replace those words with manageable, worthwhile and peaceful. Changing your thought process and your inner dialogue can help you see the positives in your situation and make the process feel less overwhelming.
Spend 15 to 30 minutes every single day listing off what you have to be grateful for. Even if you feel like you have nothing to be grateful for, search for something. Maybe you’re in a financial hole, but at least you have the intellect in your mind and the ability to walk, talk, and reason. If you search, you can always find something to be grateful for.
"Staying well-hydrated helps your body function properly, and it also helps make sure you don’t overeat," Pam Bede, M.S., R.D. with Abbott’s EAS Sports Nutrition, tells SELF. But it's not just that staying hydrated keeps you from overeating. According to Maxine Yeung, M.S., R.D., owner of The Wellness Whisk, sometimes you may feel hungry when, in fact, you're actually thirsty. Basically, no harm can come from drinking a glass of water.
If you want to make some changes in your food intake, it’s a good idea to talk to your health care provider (HCP). You may also want to ask your HCP for a referral to see a dietitian (a person who has studied nutrition and knows about healthy eating). Learning about nutrition can help you make healthier choices, but it’s important to think of food as just one important part of your life.
To begin a Master Action List, write down or type absolutely everything no matter how small. Develop the list without considering the importance or significance of each item. You will do this later. Remove everything out of your head and get it onto your list. Write down all things for which you have even the smallest responsibility to change, finish, get involved with or handle. Once completed, create sub lists by grouping and consolidating similar actions. Some tasks may be associated with certain days of the week or need to be done in a specified location or even with a particular person. Categories can be things like errands, calls to make/return, online actions, computer work, things pending or awaiting response, house projects, bills/finance, etc.
×