There's a lot of advice out there on how to eat healthy, and if we're being honest, it can sometimes feel like too much to think about. Especially when you're hungry (AKA always). Remember when you were a kid and eating was as simple as open, chew, enjoy? Yes, those were simpler times. Now, knowing how to eat healthy doesn't seem quite as straightforward. Between the diet fads, gourmet trends, and a rotating roster of superfoods, eating well has gotten, well, complicated.

Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don’t order supersized anything. At home, visual cues can help with portion sizes. Your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb. By serving your meals on smaller plates or in bowls, you can trick your brain into thinking it’s a larger portion. If you don’t feel satisfied at the end of a meal, add more leafy greens or round off the meal with fruit.
Why she cleansed "I was looking for focus," Kelly, who was traveling for work, studying for the bar, buying a home, and moving, tells SELF. She often ate meals out with friends and reached for Twix bars and fries on the road. Kelly's real estate agent suggested her frazzled client try the cleanse outlined in her favorite book, which called for days of only fruit followed by days of vegetable juices. "I needed energy, so I was willing to go along with the potential craziness."
It's trendy to think "food should be fuel" or that food is something that helps you lose (or, ahem, gain) weight. But thinking only in terms of number on the scale takes away a huge part of what eating is about: pleasure. "If you think of eating as something enjoyable and something you do without guilt or without judging yourself, and you stay active, you're less likely to overeat, have a better diet, and maintain any weight loss for the long haul," says Zied. It's true: feeling guilty about your food choices can undermine weight loss—and even pack on the pounds—while a celebratory mindset gives you more control over your diet and can thwart weight gain, found a 2014 study in the journal Appetite.

Besides being delicious and incredibly versatile, berries are a great source of both fiber and antioxidants, two important components of a well-balanced detox diet. Fiber moves slowly through the gastrointestinal tract and helps bulk up the stool to support regularity and excrete waste more efficiently. (3) Antioxidants, on the other hand, have been shown in animal models to protect the liver against oxidative stress while simultaneously preserving immune cell function. (4) Berries like blueberries and strawberries also have a high water content and can promote hydration as well as proper elimination.
Fermented foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut contain naturally occurring beneficial bacteria known as probiotics. Limited but promising evidence suggests that these foods have modest heart-related benefits. These include small improvements in blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and blood sugar, as well as weight loss. But people who include fermented foods in their diets should pay attention to what else the foods contain that might be less desirable for heart health. For example, some yogurts contain lots of sugar, and sauerkraut and pickles are high in sodium. (Locked) More »
Similarly, podcasts are a great on-the-go news source. And a lot of the time they’re just what you need to unwind without completely wasting away in front of the TV (not that I have anything against relaxing that way). I’m a big fan of tackling one podcast during my commute—half of it on the way to work, half on the way back, and the stories always bring out some real emotions. (For reference, my favorites are This American Life and You’re the Expert.)
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