Sara Giboney is a health coach and certified group fitness instructor living in Kearney, Nebraska. She offers one-on-one health coaching services in-person and virtually, and wellness workshops in Nebraska communities and businesses. A self-proclaimed dessert addict, Sara shares some of the recipes that satisfy her sweet tooth without sabotaging her health goals on her blog, Sweet Success. The blog features easy and nutritious recipes, healthy eating and fitness tips, at-home workouts and strategies for implementing self-care into your daily life. Connect with Sara! http://sweetsuccessbysara.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/saragiboney Instagram - @saragiboney Facebook - Sweet Success Blog Pinterest - Sara Giboney Google+ - Sweet Success [email protected]
This doesn’t have to be a religious experience. Simply practicing the art of meditation will boost your overall happiness, decrease stress, lower blood pressure, and ease anxieties. One recent study, published in JAMA’s Internal Medicine states just that: mindfulness meditation will ease the psychological stresses associated with depression, anxiety, and pain.

According to Foroutan, she believes there are many different ways to think of detoxification in terms of MNT. “There is the general advice for supporting detoxification pathways that can and should be done year-round, such as eating more cruciferous vegetables and high-antioxidant foods, choosing organic foods [to minimize pesticides and other toxins], drinking green tea and more water, establishing optimal bowel habits, working up a sweat regularly, and reducing contact with external toxins,” she says, adding that she believes this advice could benefit many clients.
The Hedonic Set Point, then, is a baseline of happiness that we all have, which we tend to revert to, even after things like a traumatic event or a major windfall of cash through say a lottery winning. In a study published by Campbell and Brickman, they showed that both lottery winners and paraplegics all returned to a baseline level of happiness some time after the event.
I drove to a gas station and awkwardly bought a pack of Camel cigarettes. On a scale of surrendering to cravings, it’s better than a bottle of vodka, worse than a giant brownie. I found a parking lot near the water and walked around in the rain (still in my dress and flip-flops, holding a sweatshirt over my head to save my wedding- hair) searching for a secluded place to smoke my first cigarette in years. It suddenly seemed crowds of people were milling around, screwing up my plan. And I certainly wasn’t going to smoke inside my own car. I have boundaries, after all.
Make half your plate fruits and vegetables: Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert. The more colorful you make your plate, the more likely you are to get the vitamins, minerals, and fiber your body needs to be healthy.
But I recently found myself feeling incredibly overwhelmed by my own self-improvement journey. I’m working to get out of debt, learn more about money management and change my mindset around money. I’m trying to incorporate more yoga and meditation into my life. I hired a running coach to help me train for my next half-marathon. I’m working to build my health coaching business, which means every day I’m learning about business strategies, marketing and more. I’m working on being more communicative with my partner. I’m changing my diet to get relief from my regularly occurring headaches. I’m learning about essential oils and how to incorporate them into my daily life. I’m trying to lose a few pounds. I’m trying to be a better friend and make more time for phone calls, coffee dates and hanging out. I’m working on making self-care more of a priority. I’d like to read the stack of personal development books I’ve ordered from Amazon over the past year. I’m trying to be more present. The list goes on.
One of the best ways to achieve this is through imagery. Pictures are most certainly worth a thousand words, and by hanging those photos somewhere you’ll see daily, you can help to inspire and motivate you towards your dreams. We all get a little bit frustrated time to time, but if you spend 15 to 20 minutes each on inspirational input, you’ll see enormous results.
Think about how your goals are connected. Most of my self-improvement goals build on one another. Yoga, meditation and running help me stress less, which help me to be more present in my health coaching sessions and help me to be a better partner and friend. Incorporating self-care into each day, changing my diet, running, yoga, meditation and less stress will help me lose the weight I’d like to lose. When you realize how connected your goals are, it may help you realize how important they are.
One of the best ways to achieve this is through imagery. Pictures are most certainly worth a thousand words, and by hanging those photos somewhere you’ll see daily, you can help to inspire and motivate you towards your dreams. We all get a little bit frustrated time to time, but if you spend 15 to 20 minutes each on inspirational input, you’ll see enormous results.
When I wanted to start flossing consistently, one of the most useful changes I made was taking the floss out of the drawer and keeping it next to my toothbrush on the counter. It sounds like a silly thing to focus on, but the visual cue of seeing the floss every time I brushed my teeth meant that I didn't have to remember to pull it out of the drawer.
A new twist on an old favorite ― if your favorite recipe calls for frying fish or breaded chicken, try healthier variations using baking or grilling. Maybe even try a recipe that uses dry beans in place of higher-fat meats. Ask around or search the internet and magazines for recipes with fewer calories ― you might be surprised to find you have a new favorite dish!

However, life doesn’t have to overwhelm, and it most certainly doesn’t have to frustrate. You can improve the quality of your life by making a few small adjustments to your routines by altering your behavior and your way of thinking. And keep in mind that you’re not alone; we all go through long periods of frustration, anxiety, fear, upset, and worry.

As Editor for The Muse, Alyse is proud to prove that yes, English majors can change the world. Her work has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., Motto, CNBC's Make It, USA Today College, Lifehacker, Mashable, and more. She calls many places home, including Illinois where she grew up and the small town of Hamilton where she attended Colgate University, but she was born to be a New Yorker. In addition to being an avid writer, Alyse loves to dance, both professionally and while waiting for the subway.
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