Your tip Restricting food in stressful times with a detox is counterproductive because it deprives your body of energy. You can get plenty of immune-bolstering vitamin C by filling half your plate with bright produce such as broccoli, bell peppers, kiwifruit, tomatoes, and strawberries at every meal, including in restaurants. "The lure of detox is that it's a quick fix," Blatner says. "But whatever you do for a few days will never make up for how you treat your body the other 362 days a year."
Drinking plenty of water can go a long way in flushing out toxins. While you’re on your detox diet, aim to drink eight glasses of filtered water daily. That includes a glass of water (ideally room-temperature or lukewarm) as soon as you wake up in the morning. A helpful hint: opting for lemon water or a DIY infused water may enhance the detoxing effects of your morning hydration.
The participant's goal is to get a score of 100 out of 100. The objective of the program is for the participant to get complete about 100 possible incompletions in their life. Incompletions are those physical, emotional or mental items, which are in some way not resolved in the current moment. Incompletions of any kind drain energy. That is, they require energy to live with, given it takes work to keep us whole when there is something in the space. To have full integrity (like a complete circle) is normal; the program gives one a way to get there in a natural way.

Take time to do things you enjoy. You may be so busy, or feel so badly about yourself, that you spend little or no time doing things you enjoy--things like playing a musical instrument, doing a craft project, flying a kite, or going fishing. Make a list of things you enjoy doing. Then do something from that list every day. Add to the list anything new that you discover you enjoy doing.
“Most pharmaceutical drugs are metabolized via phase 1 detoxification as well as endogenous toxins like steroids,” she says. More is known about phase 1 enzyme systems through research conducted on the metabolism of pharmaceutical drugs, she adds. This process creates an unstable intermediary metabolite (free radical) that’s further metabolized in phase 2, becoming a water-soluble molecule that can then can be excreted through urine or bile.1,2

Certainly, detoxification regimens are highly individualized and should be customized to the client based on the person’s habits, lifestyle, environmental exposure, and genetic makeup. But at its core, detoxification is a straightforward prescription: “It’s as simple as R and R: remove and replace,” Swift says. “You look at what do we need to think about removing from this person’s diet, which are the foods that precipitate metabolic endotoxemia and adverse reactions [foods related to the Western diet such as refined sugars, trans fats, and saturated fats], and then what do we need to think about replacing those foods with [such as foods with fiber, flavonoids, and antioxidants along with lifestyle modalities that support the body’s healing potential].” Metabolic endotoxemia, as Foroutan describes, is a subclinical increase in circulating “endotoxins” that triggers an inflammatory cascade that has been linked to chronic disease, including diabetes.22


WHPS enables nurses to keep licenses intact, but it can be a substantial challenge to gain employment after being found diverting, stealing/using drugs or even abusing alcohol. This is especially the case if time lapsed between jobs. Too many employers, even in Washington state, simply fire employees on the spot, leaving them to navigate sobriety, employment and licensure on their own. The consequences of this can lead to isolation and suicidal ideation/attempt. Rejection from potential employers, lack of income or insurance to pay for treatment, and the debilitating hit to self esteem can make prevailing in sobriety near impossible. It’s hard enough some days to stay on a sober track when life is running smooth.
You probably made some New Year’s resolutions or set monthly goals for yourself (whether on paper or in the back of your mind). Have you followed through on any of them? Are there ones you can get rid of, or alter? Do you feel confident in achieving all of them? Take some time this week to reflect positively on how far you’ve come, and think about where you want to be—and maybe write down the steps you need to take to get there.
×